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New Book about Marlene Dumas

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Born in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1953, Dumas has lived in Amsterdam since 1976. Though her art developed during a period marked by Conceptualism and neo-Expressionism, it steered its own course between the two.

William Kentridge /

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This large-scale exhibition of the work of the internationally renowned South African artist William Kentridge (b. 1955) spans nearly three decades of his remarkably prolific career, with an emphasis on projects completed since 2000.

Appreciating what is good

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When a collector views an artwork for the first time appreciation is usually instinctive, judgment a matter of personal taste; it is an emotional assessment.

Archiving the Contemporary

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When an invitation arrived in my inbox from HarperCollins New York to do a new book on contemporary art in South Africa with the highest production values and a large international distribution, my heart sank. I knew immediately and regretfully that the assignment was far too interesting an opportunity to turn down.

Keep the lights on!

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Once upon an era, circa 10 BC (Before Change) there was an art competition called the Cape Town Triennial, which aimed, according to its first press release in 1982, "to bring together the best contemporary art being produced in South Africa".

Filling in the blanks

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Since the late 1980s, when Steven Sack's The Neglected Tradition (1988) made clear the need to research the contribution of black artists to South African art history, and increasingly since the 1990s, there has been an upsurge in revisionist writing and in the number of book publications and exhibition catalogues on South African visual art.

Uncharted Territory

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It Is risky business setting up a gallery In Soweto but a necessary step for the
promulgation of the vsual arts, writes Mary Corrigall.

Recuperating the Present

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Public museums are losing out on building representative collections for future generations as contemporary South African art increasingly gets exported. By Carol Brown.

Park Life

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Namibian art enjoys little currency In South Africa. The opening of a recent site-
specifics project at Etosha National park allowed Kim Gurney to meet some of the
country's more established artists.

Gugs, In The House

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GugulectIve, a group of young artIsts based in the cape town township of Gugulethu
aim to foster creative interactions and debate in their community. By Gabi Ngcobo.

A Milliner's Tale

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The work of Beninese artist Meschac Gaba, currently on show In Johannesburg, often
creates a meeting place where ideas of art and life are bandied about. By Kim Gurney.

The Polyphonic Spree

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Shortly after the opening of Africa Remix, a number of visiting artists from the continent and beyond participated in a public debate. Mary Corrigall reports

Making Sense of the Pose

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Africa Remix's first panel discussion included a number of artists represented in the exhibition. Their ambiguous responses prompted an open-ended conversation between Brenden Gray and Michael Smith

Boom Theory

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There are an estimated 9.5 million high net worth individuals globally, some of them South African. Sean O'Toole looks at how they're changing the shape of art collecting

At the Centre of the Ripple

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Dungamanzi, which means stirring waters in Vatsonga, is also the title of a groundbreaking exhibition of objects made in the Tsonga and Shangaan tradition. Robyn Sassen speaks to the team of curators about their strategy to engage art audiences

A Green Hill Far Away

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Success in London, as opposed to New York, Paris or Berlin, has generally eluded South African artists. Kerryn Greenberg explores some reasons why

Humour and hurt

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A number of South African curators submitted proposals for this year's Venice Biennale, amongst them Colin Richards. The following is an edited extract of his proposal, entitled 'Punch-line: Hurt and Humour in Contemporary African Art'

The Stony Autograph

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David Lurie's recent photographs of Table Mountain provide a way of looking at it that is neither spectacular nor merely ordinary or artlessly banal, writes Ashraf Jamal

Custodians of Difficulty

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The private collector, often more so than the public institution, has played a vital role in supporting artists working in ideas. Kim Gurney finds out what motivates these collectors

Art for the Masses

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Johannesburg is being transformed by a number of public art initiatives. While these projects may need to satisfy a number of functions shouldn't the public art at their centre possess value as an art object too? asks Mary Corrigall

Showing Here, Showing There

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A recent trilogy of exhibitions by Berni Searle raises important questions about the wider practices of exhibition making and their effect on an artist's career, argues Rory Bester

Exploring the In Between

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The Very Real Time art residency is an enquiry into the spaces between people in South African cities. Organiser Gregg Smith explains exactly what this means

Home Truths

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Cameroonian artist Joel Mpah Dooh was in Johannesburg recently for the opening of his solo exhibition at Henri Vergon's Afronova Gallery. He spoke with Sean O'Toole

Faking it

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Although still relatively uncommon as a crime, the art of faking fine art is not entirely uncommon to South Africa. Kim Gurney looks at its history and also highlights some recent examples

Urban archaeology

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David Adjaye, El Anatsui, Marlene Dumas, William Kentridge and Yinka Shonibare amongst the artists exhibiting in Cape Town's inaugural art biennial. By Kim Gurney