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Afro - Alien Exquisite Corpses

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The carefully designed futuristic drawings and collages of Wangechi Mutu, who recently exhibited in Cape Town, have earned the Kenyan-born artist a cult following internationally. By Tracy Murinik

Art of Dimensions Tomorrow

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Artist Nicholas Hlobo has staged two performances wearing a customized outfit that references a Xhosa choral song about a dung beetle and alludes to sacred rites of passage. We asked this year's Tollman Award winner to explain the motivations behind his performance work

At the edge of Definition

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Earlier this year Durban-based Mlungisi Zondi won the 2006 MTN new contemporaries award for a performance piece titled silhouette. Here he discusses his evolution as a dancer, conceptual choreographer and performance artist

Live And Direct

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Born and raised in South Africa, Roselee Goldberg is a pioneering figure in the international study of performance/live art - her 1979 book performance: live art 1909 to the present remains a pivotal text. Kathryn Smith spoke to the New York-based critic, curator and scholar

Bridget Baker

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Bridget Baker is a lunatic. Stark raving mad. It is from this madness that her best work is wrought. Ever since her first solo show, about ten years ago, Baker has tempted both the South African and international markets with snippets of genius (this reviewer distinctly remembers the positive comments in visitor's books from galleries where Baker had participated in group shows). Demands for a kick-ass solo exhibition have been running high since her last solo outing in 2001.

Deborah Poynton

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Visually alluring, psychologically complex and sublimely enigmatic, Deborah Poynton's Safety & Security is a feat of ironic expression. In a deft balance of contrasts - contemporary figures in classical groupings, realistic detail in a surrealistic narrative - the painter plays intellect against emotion in a highly sophisticated portrayal of archetypal states of being.

Deborah Weber

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In his book The Past is a Foreign Country (1985), David Lowenthal suggests that the "prime function of memory … is not to preserve the past but to adapt it so as to enrich and manipulate the present". It is a simple but highly generative observation that allows one to read the double-edged sword that so often cuts into the organisation of archives and the presentation memory in public space. And it is a formulation of the complicated relationship between past and present that is frustratingly absent in Debora Weber's Art/Media - Media Art, an exhibition of the archive of the (mostly) media documents that constitute her memory of the Brett Kebble Art Awards.